Hyouka: Episode 4

Eru decides to talk about her problem with Satoshi and Mayaka. Both were quite curious about why the first book was missing, but never knew that there was something deep about the book that involved her uncle. Both of them promised to pick up whatever information they could to help her out. This time, Eru was not alone. She finally has someone whom she can lean on for help.

So, the group decided to meet up at Eru’s house to discuss what they have found. While Satoshi and Hotarou were going there, both would be talking about their lives first. Houtarou was concerned that Satoshi may be too busy with things in his own clubs that this might be a burden to him. However, Satoshi claims that, if anything, Houtarou was the one who feels like he is dragging everyone down. While Satoshi was “neon bright” by nature, he claims that Houtarou would be pretty dull, if not, someone with no personality at all. Yet, even someone blank like Houtarou can bring out certain colors from other people such as Eru. I think that Satoshi said pretty much sums up the current views of what many could have for Houtarou so far.

The two arrive at Eru’s mansion, which was quite a large plantation, considering the power that her family has. The two would meet up with Eru who takes them to the guest area where Mayaka was waiting for them. Here, it was suggested that they take turns discussing about what it is that they found and what their theory was from the information gathered. Eru researched the second book itself and notated the critical information concerning about her uncle. She states that something must have happened to her uncle that he did such that he would be kicked out from this school. She claims that, since he must have been kicked out during the school fair, something must have happened during the fair that caused him to be kicked out. However, Houtarou and Satoshi disagreed, for Eru disregarded the political culture that was going on at the time that should not have influenced such things.

Mayaka asks for forgiveness, for her theory highly contrasts that of Eru. Here, Mayaka reveals an article in the past that coul have been related to what was going on with Eru’s uncle, for it was published at around the same time as the second issue. Here, Maya believes that there was some sort of student activism happening at the school at the time. Her uncle would have been the leader of the student activities taking on the authorities that were trying to take away or disrupt the student’s power. Mayaka would conclude that Eru’s uncle was kicked out before the festival began and that there may have been some violence involved since the students must have resisted in some way. However, the main flaw was the timeline. It it were true that he did that in June, he would have been expelled immediately; instead, he was kicked out in October. The four moth difference was what was bothering them.

Next was Satoshi, who claims that his information was contrasting with Mayaka’s. Here, Satoshi looks up certain articles that the school newspaper has written about that concerns the timeline they were discussing. Satoshi claims that there was no violence involved at all, but some form to resistance must have occurred. Based on the articles, Satoshi suggests that not only was her uncle involved, but the entire school body was backing up this movement as well led by either the council or a figurehead that was supporting all of the students together. Some sort of student movement must have happened such that the entire student body would be involved in to resist any sort of action the school was trying to take. While Satoshi was able to give out useful information, he claims that he cannot draw any conclusions because that is what a database is.

Finally, it was Houtarou’s turn, but he did not really prepare anything of much importance. However, time was on his side when the day suddenly rained and Eru had to go outside to gather what she left behind. Houtarou would use this as an advantage to go to the bathroom, but instead found her room. After seeing how much work she has done for it, Houtarou tries to carefull deduct exactly what has happened to her uncle. Houtarou returns, explaining what was on his mind. Houtarou states that the culture festival was indeed the reason for his departure, but it was not the fact that there was a festival, but that it lasted for five days. Here, Houtarou states that negotiations must have happened during June to have such a long festival, but the teachers did not like the idea of devoting such a long time for it. This was why the students were angry, so they most likely have boycotted in some way. With their boycott, the teachers have no choice but to allow them to do what they want. However, the expense was that Eru’s uncle would have to leave the school once the fair was over. While the negotiations did happen in June, the timeskip was such that if they were to kick him out early, it would cause unrest in the entire school. Therefore, they made him leave once the students were satisfied with what they had done.

Houtarou’s theory was able to connect all three of their stories, making it the most realistic and plausible out of the three. While his story does make sense, Eru brings up a good question. If indeed he did something like that, Eru would have at least considered her uncle a hero. Yet, the story that her uncle told made her cry. So, how can that be? It also seems as though Houtarou only scratched the surface of the story. It is implied that Houtarou may have actually known what truly happened, but did not wish to discuss about it in front of them. Could it be for her sake? The next episode looks to be the final part of this arc. There, will the mystery of her tears be answered.

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